About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
MSNBCW 13
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 45
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
level. secondarily, if you say deficit reduction, the partisan are leeched out. we are talking about whether it will work to balance the budget. if along the way 35 million become uninsured, that's sad but we don't talk about it because cbo didn't mention it in the score. that's the great trick of paul ryan to recognize if you only talk about budget deficit, where does your budget put the deficit 20, 30 years from now, the amount of things you sneak in under that cloak that you can never put into the conversation in a serious way in normal times is tremendous. that's the central political innovation of his career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's no break through.
can you tell us when conservatives get more honest about the debt and deficit. a conservative columnist says about the new ryan budget, it sacrificed seriousness for seriousness by promising to reach budgetary balance, not over the long term as budgets 1.0 and 2.0 did, but in a ten year window. this is not going to happen, and more importantly there's no reason why it needs to happen. modest deficits are perfectly compatible with fiscal responsibility. talk about singing a new tune. and the conservative think tank, the american enterprise institute asks why does the budget need to balance in ten years? debt reduction doesn't require balance, just that the economy is growing faster than the debt, while the plan does put the debt to gdp ratio on a downward trajectory, it probably doesn't need to be quite as steep. ezra klein, this is a big deal, and you're here on this show to prove it is a big deal. you would never come out this late if this wasn't a huge deal. >> absolutely not. >> this is huge. the debt is the reason we have to do all these terrible things to medicare, which
and then on the deficit this year, the democrat deficit would be 164 billion dollars bigger than the republican deficit. and next year, 308 billion dollars, just to give you a sense of it, by 2015 the republican deficit would be down to 125 billion and the democrat deficit 433 billion. there's a big indication of the difference between the parties when you look at the budgets of the budget blueprints of the republicans in the house and the democrats in senate and republicans want to restrain spending and democrats want to continue to blow up the budget and eventually, over the decade add 1 trillion dollars of new taxes. >> sean: yeah, so 1 trillionew a trillion dollars, this is like they know no other way, all right? that's point one, but yet, they still will give us almost trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see throughout the entire ten-year period. here is the big issue though, i want to see obamacare repealed, but it's not going to happen through paul ryan's budget plan. the republicans, if they want that to happen, to get ryan's plan through, they're going to have to during one of the c
congressman paul ryan a budget. >> this budget more than just balanced. >> can we reduce our deficit and debt and still help those who are neediest in america. can we have a safety net that survives and still reduce the deficit? paul ryan says no. >> at least budgets are passing around here for a change. the government's going to have to learn to do more with less, it's not the government's money, it's the people's money. >> the senate democrats are considering a number of balances ever-- >> and house committee chair paul ryan telling us republicans and democrats are still world's apart. well, that is an understatement. we saw that just an hour ago. the democratic-led senate defeating the ryan house budget 40-59. so is there any hope left? here is congressman paul ryan. >> great to see you. >> great it to see you again. >> greta: i want to talk about the budget that passed today, i imagine you're happy. >> we're very happy. we passed a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the
decade. and $100 billion in stimulus spending. and would do little to cut spending or the deficit. four democrats mark pryor of arkansas, kay haigen of north carolina, mark baggich of alaska and max bachus of montana all up for reelection in november joined senate republicans who voted against it. even though the margin was close senate leaders were praising colleagues for a job well done. >> i know everyone is exhausted. and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. average vote 37 amendments we have done twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> harris: next the senate must reconcile the budget with a plan passed by republicans. now, context showing how differently the plans would deal with the economy. the senate plan calls for $46.5 trillion in spending, nearly $5 trillion more than the house plan and more revenue an additional $1 b
right now. then we address the long term budget deficit in a balanced way where we ask for shared responsibility as opposed to the republican plan which provides another tax break wind fall to very wealthy people at the end of everybody else. the expense of the middle class, the expense of commitments to seniors. so our focus right now is to number one, do no harm to the economy. number two, invest in a jobs plan that will help put people back to work. whether building roads or bridges or infrastructure or other things important to our economy. >> why will it take until 2040 to balance the budget under your plan? >> well, if you actually look at the past 40 years, we've only had four balanced budgets. those were during the clinton years and once leaning over to the bush years and then they squandered that balance. so the reason we do that is our focus is on jobs, craig. our focus is on meeting our commitments to seniors. we will not balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education or on the backs of our commitments to seniors. whether it is under medicare or medicaid. what w
of the simpson-bowles plan. the plan reduced the deficit through the balance approach that clued additional targets cuts and also revenue from closing a lot of the special interest tax breaks for very wealthy people, tax breaks which mitt romney and paul ryan talked been on the campaign trail. >> neil: they were without raising the overall rate. now we have the rates raised. so republicans talk of a need for a trigger. they might go along with this tax break stuff and all their closing the loopholes, that they did agree it's sort of wasting time and money and the tax code, but you guys have then got to, as part of the trigger, agree simultaneously to these cuts you talked about. what do you make of that? >> well, first of all, the difference is republicans have never said they're willing to close some of those tax loopholes for the purpose of reducing the deficit. which is what the bipartisan -- >> neil: i got a couple on you. i suspect no angel in the ranks of either party. but they did say that they would be open to closing these loopholes but without this being the only negotiating point
and millions of americans who say that the economy is the main issue. second to the economy is the deficit. it goats back to the fundamental issue of moderation. this is the achilles' heel for the republican party. everything is just black and white. whereas most folks, most americans in the middle believe in moderation. whether we do our own taxes or finances, we sit down and figure out, how do we cut a little here, save alternates there, increase revenue? so the problem with the republican party is they're out of step how most of us work on a day-to-day basis. that's something that the president has been so good at reflecting in his bigger vision of deficit reduction and the economy as a bigger issue. >>> clarence, you still here boehner say no new ref, though the american people are saying new revenue. they're saying we don't have an immediate crisis, but we need immediate cuts. why are we cutting head start and other things immediately if there's no immediate problem. a new republican leaning poll, a republican-leaning poll says just 16% of americans said the deficit and the debt with
for that, because we had the great recession, and we needed to engage in some deficit spending to offset that demand contraction. historically the debt goes up in periods like this. in world war ii, it breached 100%, then a few years later it was 50%. the debt is expected to start coming down within a few years. over the long term, there are real pressures on the debt through health care costs. that's what i would tell mr. penny. >> excellent. that's very helpful. josh, the president last week was secured on the right for suggesting there was no dead crisis in american. later in the week this is what speaker boehner and paul ryan had to say. take a listen. >> is he right, that we don't have an immediate crisis. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis. >> we do not have a debt crisis right now, but we see it's coming. it's irrefutably happening. >> what are they doing by repeatedly fanning into flame the notion of a debt crisis, when they themselves when asked directly say exactly what jared said. in the immediate short term, it is not a pressing issue. >> it's because it's instrumenta
as this president's-- as this president tells us we don't have a deficit problem. >> greta: i don't get in. the pr, look, he's not going to sit down every night and do the budget himself, he outsources to his staff, but you've got the house and the senate had the same hurdles he did, whether it's a continuing resolution or sequestration, the same problems and they've now gotten their two budgets in and you think that he would crack the whip on his own staff and say, get this in so we can move forward. >> i have to tell you, greta, when i was the mayor of new york i did my budget. i spent hours, stayed up until, 3, 4, 5 in the morning at times going through the budget because i believed that i understand it as the chief executive. i had to understand the budget because the only way you really can make an impact on government is by understanding the budget. and for this president to be in office for five years, not be able to get a budget done on time, really tells us that he has no interest in our economy, he has no real interest in straightening out our budget problems. i don't know what his prior
. it never balances. never comes close to balancing. it claims that it reduces the deficit over 10 years by $1.5 trillion. that is not correct. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonderhat other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. bill: there's a top republican senator now demanding answers from the fbi director after not being briefed on their benghazi investigation for the last six months. four americans died in the assault on the u.s. consulate including our ambassador chris stevens. senator susan collins says she wants some simple questions answered. quote, are any of the suspects believed to be responsible for the deaths of these four americans including ambassador stevens in u.s. or libyan custody? how many suspects in the attacks are still at large? a few other questions after that. virginia republican congressman frank wolf has been fighting for answers in benghazi. he is our guest now. sir, good morning,
, taxes, spending and deficits. and the notion that they're going to somehow come together, there's really no, no, i guess, carrot for them to go after here. >> and then they go home for two weeks. >> sure. >> and the question is are they going to hear anything from their constituents that's going to move anybody. i don't know. >> i think that they're not. and the best chance that they had to potentially hear about it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you
austerity and budget cutting and debt and deficit and then last weekend speaker boehner admits that we don't have an immediate debt problem. wit well, we're still sort of as a collective body stuck on this idea that, you know, it's all about cuts and how many and how much when the real issue should be jobs. these budgets should be evaluated based on how many people they put to work, how many problems they solve for the american people. five years ago in my district the bridge fell into the mississippi river. our bill would fix the problems like that and make those things a thing of the past and they put a lot of people back to work, too. >> absolutely. mr. o'reilly and other republicans, they're upset because you and your caucus have offered alternatives to paul ryan's massive spending cuts. and as i say, job creation is the first item on the executive summary of your report. the first item under that is infrastructure. now, the american society of civil engineers -- and this is, you know, an engineering organization, not a political one. >> left wing cooks? >> we need $1.6 trillion spendi
do both. make sure we have deficit reduction but don't cut too much too fast. >> dick durbin also optimistic they can move forward. as congress grapples with developing a budget it must deal with another problem that looms it has to pass a continued resolution before march 27th to avert a government shut down. heather, they go on break at the end of this week. we will see what happens. >> of course they do. they are always going on breakdown there. >>> it is time for your first degree weather update with ma r maria molina. >> maria is in the weather center tracking another storm. is that right? >> yes. a brand new storm impacting portions of the upper midwest today and we are expecting to see snow from the same system into the northeast as we height. we could be seeing significant accumulations especially across places in new england. want to start out with high temperatures. we are seeing wild disparities as far as the temperatures go. take a look at minneapolis. 30 degrees for the high temperature today. it will feel more like january than march. in san antonio you could see rec
-day delivery. >>> faced with a billion dollar deficit, dozens of elementary schools in chicago are being closed. officials claim most of the 54 elementary schools to be shut down are half empty anyway. but opponents say these closures mostly in poor and black areas will further erode neighborhoods and endanger children who will now have to travel even further. >>> all right. one of california's most popular tourist attractions celebrating a major milestone, the rock, better known as alcatraz, is marking a half a century without its famous inhabitants. 50 years ago this week the last prisoners left the federal penitentiary, which is in the middle of san francisco bay. if you visit soon, you will be able to see a new exhibit there, photographs of the prison on its very final day. you ever been? >> no. >> it's very cool. i don't know why, it's just an empty prison but something about it is cool. >>> time to check the weather across the nation. it still feels like winter almost everywhere. atlanta and nashville will see a messy rain/snow mix. blustery around washington, d.c. rain from little rock t
of spending decisions that add up to massive debt and deficit. tonight, there is a week-long series on what to cut. >> government is not the solution to the problem. government the problem. >> rare of big government is over. >> every president called to streamline federal bureaucracy but none succeeded. >> government is largeer than it ever has been. the debt is growing at record rate. >> adjusted for inflation. government spending went up from $882 billion spent every year in 1980s to $1.48 trillion in the 1990s. $2.24 trillion a year and the first decade of the 21st century. mast ited that government will have spent almost as much in the first four years as a new decade as in the 1990s. >> in the past there bar crisis like world war ii or the korean war, nondefense spending was cut by 20 to 30%. >> that didn't happen after 9/11 or after the financial crisis. >> nothing typifies the expansion of government as much as the growing wealth of the washington, d.c. area. region with few neutral resources and little manufacturerring to produce well. the average government worker compensation is o
there? you can go and beat hair cut there. but they are running deficits of $350,000 a year. time to privatize? >> kimberly: time to supercuts. >> dana: speaking of that, we did a google search. if you let the senators know it would not be the end of the world if you had to give up the senate barbershop. look on the map. there are seven places in walking distance from the capitol to get your hair cut. >> kimberly: now give them coupons to go over there. and give it to the barber and start it up. c'mon, i pay less to get my hair done. >> dana: time to privatize the senate barbershop? >> greg: i don't know. look at the success the barbershops have had. good job, guys. >> eric: you got your hair cut? >> greg: they fell asleep at the wheel. i use the great acres analogy. obama's democrats are like the sexy zaza that could expense every vehicle they have. eddie arnold is the guy that always has to play the bills. we have zsa zsa gabor in the white house. it's great because in a sense they're our mother so they tell us thousand use the microwave. might be at night they give us a bedtime
struggling? economists point to concern about the debt and deficit. uncertain effects of the obamacare. especially the weight of tax increases. >> it's negative for economic growth overtime. global economy, we compete, with many other nations. part of the competition is taxes. >> conservative critics argue big government fools itself to thinking taxing and spend willing make the economy grow. >> it assumes you take money from the economy right pocket and put in the left pocket and manualicly you more money. >> administration defenders, though, look at it differently. >> under normal circumstances, you don't want the government intervening. in the circumstances where we have the weak demand this is a good time for the government to step in. >> even though who want to spend less would increase spending at lower rate. >> bret: house lawmakers vote down budget proposals as an alternative to g.o.p. plan put forward by paul ryan. senators approved a stop gap spending plan. continuing resolution to keep the government funded after the end of the month. senate has, now it heads to the house. a
that are confident. they are at odds about the budget deficit. they believe the federal government should be required to balance the budget. and when asked to describe the national debt 68 percent said it is an immediate problem. 27 percent said it's something that can be handled in the future. only 4 percent said it's not a problem. >> reveal your weight or pay a penalty. cvs announcing all workers on company healthcare must have an annual wellness review and report their weight, body fat, blood pressure and more. if they don't they will be charged $600 more a year. people not only criticizing the penalty but also wondering this about worker's privacy. in a statement cvs said personal health information would remain private. so we want to know would you reveal this information? send us your comments at foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com. >>> 9 minutes to the top of the hour. you are looking at president obama arriving at ramallah. this as a short time ago a rocket launched into southern israel. we have a live report from ramallah on the other side of the break. 15 of the 9-11 hijackers came from saudi arab
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
to reduce the district's 1 billion-dollar budget deficit. officials say that many of those schools are half empty and that this move will save hundreds of millions of dollars. a louisiana judge is ruling that a new law that bars felons from owning guns violates that state's constitution. residents passing an amendment in november of last year, that challenged law now heads to the supreme court. now for a segment that we like to call what the hill? and you will understand why in just a second it was supposed to be money for the future but 15 years later it's just money down the drain. $24 million in federal funding was spent on a four building complex named after democratic congressman james clyburn. the problem just one building has been built and another 80 million is needed to finish it. that plan to end mail delivery on saturdays just return to served sender. congress has just passed legislation that requires saturday delivery. the postal service planned to stop saturday service lower cost after it lost $16 billion last year. the fbi is trying to figure out how a guy posing as a pilot go
if you don't tax device makers? it comes from the taxes. this is going to be added on the deficit. they constructed a budget, that made it look as if, as obama promised, not going to cost the treasury a dime. well, the cbo says it will cost $1.3 trillion over a decade. so there is an increase in $1.3 trillion plus a dime in taxes. so that it ends up looking like it's not going to cost. but there will be increases in taxes everywhere. this one will be canceled. it's ridiculous. this is the one area, medical devices where the u.s. has tremendous advantage in technology over the rest of the world. why would you kill an industry that is so productive? so, the money will be cut. it will have to come out of taxes. the $1.3 trillion will become $1.6 trillion. it will climb. ultimately it will be a drag on the economy. i think ultimately after it hits and you get a train wreck and all the inefficiencies people will say in a couple of years, why don't we adopt a canadian system? cut out the middleman. and stop all the waste. simply have a simple system. government is completely in control
billion deficit. they don't want to get to where stock toeupbs righ stockton is right now so they are under this emergency pherg, state control. a lot of people have scheduled a protest today, are being called for to protest this move. what exactly wha will he be responsible for? >> slicing and dicing. cutting salaries of city employees. detroit already has a high crime rate. you don't want what happened to stockton, just like matt said they have per capita more murders in the city of chicago. how is that possible, little stockton? if you look at the map in california everybody was moving out in san francisco, properties were too high there, same with palo at torques silicon valley, they moved to stockton. what could happen in detroit unless they start cutting more. if detroit has to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy municipal that would make headlines around the world and kind prus would be booted off the front page. >> that's what they are trying to do and -- >> the mayor and the city council loose all the authority they shr-fplt they've been trying and they can't do that. the
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
what's called video deficit when they watch the screen passively, they can't really assemble a coherent narrative about what's happening. the way our brains develop, we need some interaction, which a tablet actually supplies because you do something and you get a response for it. it's not a substitute for a loving care giver of some sort in your life, but at least it's responding. >> i do wonder, though, about attention spans. i have two kids, 6 and 10. i'm one of these brooklyn mommies that buys hand made wooden toys from germany andy courages the kids to read books. although when i need them to be quiet, i will hand them the kindle fire. and i do notice that they're a little more -- my son is a little more agitated after playing games on that. is there anything there to worry about really? >> let's start by saying your son's a boy. i'd say based on my experience -- and those who grew occupy without these devices is the same. it's true, all things in moderation, although as part of her expiration of the story, hannah kind of experimented on her own kid and let her youngest play as much
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
deficit reduction who say this budget won't do it. >> okay, congressman. as you know, house democrats are also out with their budget. joining senate democrats in calling for more revenue as well as spending to create jobs. but paul ryan didn't seem too optimistic about this this morning. take a listen to what he said. >> all the democratic budgets have one theme. more taxes, higher spending, never balancing the budget. if you look at these two budgets, yeah, we're two worlds apart. we're literally on different planets. >> he says you're literally on different planets. do you, therefore, have any hope of a compromise? >> well, not very much with paul ryan. i do believe that as steny hoyer, the himinority whip said he thinks republicans are going to have a difficult time getting votes for this budget. as we remember, the republican presidential candidate in 2012 ran away from the ryan budget which was not nearly as severe as this one is. so he's going to have problems with his own members in the republican conference and on this vote, but, you know, paul ryan is right. we are on very di
out of our deficits, we could save social security, medicare and have an economic growth boom that we haven't seen in a long time. >> california alone in one shale oil field has 100 billion barrels of oil. that is california. >> sean: how stupid, we are a stupid country. we're stupid because we allow the government-- why are you looking at me. >> i'm agreeing with you. >> sean: we're a stupid country. >> we need to get out of our own way, but this is a little bit after small detail, but a very important one for business and for america to understand. last week, one of the rules of the obama administration put out was to say that if you're going forward with any sort of project you're going to have to tell us how much carbon that will put out into the-- so it's called the nipa analysis and that's like putting a ten pound weight on everybody's ankle. >> sean: that's a hundred pound weight. >> it sounds like a minor bureaucratic detail, but it will strangle-- >> you guys will weigh in and i hope you'll pick a fight with you here. i've got to tell you, dana, they're not doing this, not ta
step in the right direction. according to the weekly standard after running deficits 350,000 a year for years. the senate hair care center is and according to the sergeant at arms who is responsible for trying out the new model, government subsidized haircuts shaves and shine will be a thing of the past and you the taxpayer will no longer foot the bill for the grooming of your senators. the american taxpayers have forked over 5.25 million dollars for, yes, senate hair care. pretty unbelievable, or maybe not. because we do know how important the perfect haircut is well, to certain senators. remember john edwards? remember this? ♪ i feel pretty, oh so pretty ♪ ♪ i feel pretty and witty and bright ♪ ♪ >> oh, what a classic. that's all the time we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled, the news continues. greta is next and see you back here tomorrow night. greta, take it away. >> greta: this is a fox news alert. an 8th marine has died after a mortar shell explosion during a training accident in nevada. several marines w
deficits and debt. how can you not worry about that. they do seem integrally involved in phobia, a lot of we don't want anybody else coming to this country. >> yeah, yeah, that's -- that's true, chris. it's this idea that they're losing their country. they fear change. they fear -- they're anxious about the change that we see. we see the browning of america. we see, you know, the gay rights movement is preceding at pace. you know, we saw the first female speaker of the house not too long ago. so it's this change that they have a problem dealing with, chris. and let me get to the point about -- >> why would somebody care -- i always wondered about this. why would somebody who is white care about whether the country is white 100 years from now? they're not going to be here. and the people here would be comfortable with it. your nature will change with the country's nature. it does sound like pure racism. if you want the country to be tribally white 100 years from now. i don't know why a black person would care either. why do people speculate the way they think what the country will be li
.6 trillion annual budget, he can manage a $16 trillion deficit, but somehow he can't figure out how to keep tours open for the american people? he can't even figure that out? how is he supposed to figure out all those other heady things bob is talking about the real serious decisions which he can't control that he does control which is the white house. bill: talk about the job loss. that eventually will come. bob, if you were working in the white house would you have closed off the tours? i mean is that the decision you would have reached for? >> i would have canceled toilet paper order first. the reality is, but, look, you know, when brad talks about this, there are now boats in newport news, virginia, in for retrofitting have been stopped, the work on them. there are airports that are in fact airports closed down, small ones around the country. there have been furloughs done at the border. there are a lot of things going on here that should not be looked at. bill: it will not look good if you have 35,000,000 members of congress and their family members on the south lawn -- >> i'm not argu
're going to see the debt and deficit dwindle massively. let's talk about the contest in which dr. carson were speaking, if were talking about the debt and the policy prescriptions of the democrats and the obama administration then he needs to present a counter argument. he needs to present a vision for america that goes against that and he's fnot doing that, he's condemning and criticizing the president's motives, and by insinuation. >> that's absolutely not true. and in fact-- >> disrespectful for the office. >> first of all, he's not run for office. he's not doing this to seek political power, he loves this country. and number one. number two, you mentioned the debt, megyn, this president by the time he leaves office and reelected and we can all agree it that would have added more to the debt than all of his predecessors, including the much maligned george w. bush combined. he had no pro growth, and doesn't protect the balance and the president is delinquent by two months presenting a budget. en you're making your assessment at 5% growth and we have government spending at 25% of gdp. t
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
should be used to tackle the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply tax, cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. >> reporter: now the senate did not accept the paul ryan house budget. the patty murray budget, the senate plan will probably come up to a vote 2:00 a.m. or so. uma: 2:00 a.m. regardless how votes will go won't there be need for serious negotiations? >> reporter: no question about that the house has a very different version than the senate. the house said they would balance the budget without raising taxes. the senate is doing more spending, more taxes. so our colleague greta van susteren asked house budget chair paul ryan about next steps. >> house passed the budget. the senate is passing a budget first time we've seen that in four years. that's a good thing. the question is now can we start looking for common ground? can we started a advancing toward a compromise? the way we look at this as house republicans. we understand our budget probably won't become law in every great detail but hopefully we get a down payment on this p
spending but leaves the government with $566 billion in annual deficits over the next ten years. the house plan balances the budget by 2023 with big cuts in domestic spending and major changes to medicare and the tax code. charlie rangel, new york's most famous congressman, is here with me. former chair of the house ways and means committee. start with the chasm between the two plans. is there room for compromise at all between the senate and house plan? >> the major difference is that, obama and most of the country that voted for him really thinks that a time of recession that we're coming out of it that we should be creating jobs and not laying off people just with cuts. that is the difference. the major difference between the senate and the house. republicans say no taxes, no money, no investment. well, that's absolutely ridiculous. in order to get people back to work and having disposable income, you've got to invest in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
. here is the next question. is reducing the federal deficit a worthy goal in and of itself? and 85% say yes. 11% say no. it's not just john boehner who said it's not an immediate problem. paul ryan, the face of fiscal responsibility himself this past weekend on one of the sunday shows said not an immediate problem. so americans have gotten the message that it is a problem and that we should be tackling it right now, even though our lawmakers feel it can be down the road a year, five years, whatever we tackle it. >> brian: our next guest has nothing to at to this subject. so i'll move on. >> steve: he does. he's going to -- >> brian: he's coming out of his chair. solar companies were supposed to boost our economy. now evidence they might be tanking our economy. you remember solyndra that cost american taxpayers more than $500 million. turns out it may have a successor. >> steve: months after opening, the oregon based solar panel company, solo power, is facing layoffs, putting 250 million of our taxpayer dollars in jeopardy. apparently stuart varney, we learned nothing from solyndra. >> n
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)